Training&Test

The Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) is a relatively complete test assessment system established by Japan Foundation for International Exchange and Japan Educational Exchanges and Services in 1984, and has been offered in relevant countries and regions in the same year. In 2008, there were as many as 173 cities in 51 countries and regions (excluding Japan) holding this test and 750,000 examinees. The association set up planning commission and test commission. Planning committee is responsible to make the implementation plan and to analyze and assess the test results; the test commission is responsible to assign subject for the test.

Test Setting:

In China, the National Education Examinations Authority is responsible for the organization and implementation of the test. As of 2008, there were 60 test centers in 30 cities in 24 provinces (autonomous regions and municipalities directly under the central government) across the country. The test was held twice per year since 2009 on the forenoon of the first Sunday in July and December. There are no restrictions on age, occupation, education, region, nationality and school status. Chinese citizen holding formal resident identification card and foreigners holding passport can register online. In Japan, Japan Educational Exchange and Services administers the test.

The test assesses the Japanese language proficiency of non-native Japanese speakers. The test is divided into four levels, among which level 1 is equivalent to the level of year-3 to 4 undergraduates majoring in Japanese language. Each level is divided into such three components as words and vocabularies, listening, and reading and grammar. All questions are selective questions. The total score is 400. Answering more than 70% correctly (that is, 280 scores) for level 1 will pass the test. Answering more than 60% correctly (that is, 240 scores) for level 2, 3 and 4 will pass. The Result Report Letter will be issued to the candidate by the Japan Foundation through the National Education Examination Authority and test centers. Those who pass the test will be given certificate issued by Japan Foundation. The Certificate of Qualification for all level 1, 2, 3 and 4 are valid permanently.

Introduction to “JLPT”

Introduction to the new “JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test)

The Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) is a test testing and authenticating the Japanese language proficiency of non-native Japanese language learner inside and outside Japan. In 2009, there were 900,000 examinees worldwide. This test is held by Japan Educational Exchange Service in Japan, and jointly by Japan Foundation and National Education Examination Authority in China.

In China, the National Education Examinations Authority is responsible for the organization and implementation of the test. As of 2009, there were more than 70 test centers in 37 cities across the country. The test was held twice per year since 2009 on the forenoon of the first Sunday in July and December.

The range of candidates taking JLPT has been expanding and the purposes of taking the test have also been increasing. Besides testing Japanese language proficiency, a lot of people take the test for employment, upgrading and promotion. The requirements and recommendations to the test are also increasing. Therefore, most Japanese language training institutions take this as the training target, among which Beijing New Oriental has a strong teacher team consisting of many overseas returnees from Japan, senior doctors who have taught in Japanese universities, and local Japanese language teaching elites. In addition, the Japan Foundation and Japan Educational Exchanges introduced a revised version of the test in 2010, which takes full advantage of the most advanced research in Japanese pedagogy and testing theory, and reflects the vast wealth of data accumulated since the original JLPT was launched over 25 years ago.

Level:

N” represents “Nihongo (Japanese) and “New”. N1 and N2 test has 2 subjects of “language knowledge (words, vocabularies, grammar) and reading” and “listening”; N3, N4 and N5 test has 3 subjects of “language knowledge (words and vocabularies)”, “language knowledge (grammar) and reading” and “listening”. The total score of all levels is 180.

Test Reformation:

New JLPT has five levels: N1, N2, N3, N4 and N5. N1 deepens the highly difficult part comparing with Level 1 of original JLTP (equivalent to the level of year-3 to 4 undergraduates majoring in Japanese language), but its pass line is almost the same with that; N2 is basically the same as Level 2 of original JLPT; N3 is in between the Level 2 and Level 3 of original JLPT (newly set up); N4 is basically the same as Level 3 of original JLPT; N5 is basically the same as Level 4 of original JLPT.

[1] Assessment criteria of reformed new JLPT:

Whether a candidate passes the test is assessed through the pass line of overall score and score of each subject. Pass line of each individual subject means that the score shall at least meet the pass line. If any of score of individual subjects does not reach the pass line, no matter how high the overall score is, the candidate shall not be deemed as pass the test.

Subject and Time:

N1 and N2 test has 2 subjects of “language knowledge (words, vocabularies, grammar) and reading” and “listening”; N3, N4 and N5 test has 3 subjects of “language knowledge (words and vocabularies)”, “language knowledge (grammar) and reading” and “listening”.